The Banshees of Inisherin (2022)

#4. Banshees of Inisherin

"McDonagh's films all battle in their own ways with a sense of inner turmoil, wrapped neatly in a tragicomedic package, with shell casings and a funny little note scribbled alongside it.

Not too heavy, nor superficial, there is a lightness to his darkness that makes his films truly his own."

A spiritual successor to Martin McDonagh's indelible In Bruges, the Banshees of Inisherin takes us back to McDonagh's Irish roots and distills the question of existentialism in light of happiness:

Are we happier living simple, blissful lives of generally little importance, or do we find greater glory in creating a legacy and sacrificing the present, in order to leave behind something of lasting value?

Such questions aren't necessarily meant to be answered, though in light of modern medicine, science, and technology, humans no longer live just to survive.  Humans nowadays, need to thrive.

Setting the story in such era, juxtaposes this question even further.  Are we better off toiling and sacrificing knowing that our time is limited, or are we meant to enjoy what time we have and accept things the way they are?

McDonagh's films all battle in their own ways with a sense of inner turmoil, wrapped neatly in a tragicomedic package, with shell casings and a funny little note scribbled alongside it.

Not too heavy, nor superficial, there is a lightness to his darkness that makes his films truly his own.

 

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